Category Archives: About Rhiannon Lassiter

Blog move

I’ve moved this blog to a locally hosted version on my site. You can now find it at blog.rhiannonlassiter.com. Go there for all new posts including some exciting news about the Hex trilogy! Advertisements

Clarke award: Our revels now are ended

After two years my duties as a Science Fiction Foundation judge for the Arthur C. Clarke award have come to an end. Last Wednesday we gave China Miéville the award for The City and The City: an unprecedent third win for the author who has already receieved the award twice before for Perdido Street Station […]

Gender traditionalism leaves so little for girls

The other day I posted about Disney’s worries that fairytale princesses are unappealing to boys. Another reminder came today that they are also unappealing to girls. Viv Groskop writes in the Guardian about trying to take her 3-year-old daughter on a feminist journey: Despite my best efforts, my three-year-old daughter Vera hasn’t exactly been celebrating […]

Tangled up in Disney

It’s hardly surprising that after so much marketing of fairytales to girls that boys might feel included. With so much emphasis on Princesses and fairies, wings and glitter and a sea of pink is it surprising that boys, and undoubtedly a number of girls too, are turned off?

Things I read on the internet

The Guardian asked writers for their ten rules for writing (part one and part two available here). I like lots of bit and pieces of advice and might take one rule from each author. But overall I liked this advice the best: Ian Rankin 1 Read lots. 2 Write lots. 3 Learn to be self-critical. […]

Birthday bookswap woes

Twenty five children are invited to the party and each is asked to bring a (wrapped) book. At the end of the party each child takes away a different (still wrapped) book. The problem is that the children hate it.

Middle child syndrome in trilogies

The work that falls to the middle book is to broaden and deepen the story, to add another dimension to the characters and the world. This is difficult to pull off in an action adventure where the plot must wind its way through a valley in the shadow of two obvious peaks. No wonder that middle books, as is sometimes said of middle children, are the least loved.

2010: welcome to the future

Happy new year to everyone! This post is 19 days late because I began the new year with a stinking cold and I didn’t even go out and play in the snow which has been 8 inches deep or more across Oxford. Here’s a view of my garden from my window. I only went out […]

Dreams poll

Living in Dreams

I once wrote a novel called Waking Dream. For a long time (until Bad Blood) it was the novel I was proudest of. I think that’s because I live in dreams. When I was little I didn’t have a lot of friends who “made things up”. Maybe that was just my group of friends but […]